XML Cancer News

New method for non-invasive prostate cancer screening

published about 19 hours ago
(American Institute of Physics) A team of researchers led by Shaoxin Li at Guangdong Medical College in China has demonstrated the potential of a new, non-invasive method to screen for prostate cancer, a common type of cancer in men worldwide. They describe their laboratory success testing an existing spectroscopy technique called surface-enhanced Raman scattering with a new, sophisticated analysis technique called support vector machine.

Sabotage as therapy: Aiming lupus antibodies at vulnerable cancer cells

published about 19 hours ago
(Yale University) Yale Cancer Center researchers may have discovered a new way of harnessing lupus antibodies to sabotage cancer cells made vulnerable by deficient DNA repair.The study, led by James E. Hansen, M.D., assistant professor of therapeutic radiology at Yale School of Medicine, found that cancer cells with deficient DNA repair mechanisms (or the inability to repair their own genetic damage) were significantly more vulnerable to attack by lupus antibodies.

Latest ear, nose, throat, head and neck research to be presented Sept. 21-24

published about 19 hours ago
(American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery) The latest research on sleep apnea, tonsillectomies, hearing loss, head and neck cancers and other otolaryngic topics will be presented in Orlando, FL, September 21-24, at the 2014 Annual Meeting & OTO EXPO℠ of the American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation.

Enzyme controlling metastasis of breast cancer identified

published about 19 hours ago
(University of California - San Diego) Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified an enzyme that controls the spread of breast cancer. The findings, reported in the current issue of PNAS, offer hope for the leading cause of breast cancer mortality worldwide. An estimated 40,000 women in America will die of breast cancer in 2014, according to the American Cancer Society.

‘Prepped’ by tumor cells, lymphatic cells encourage breast cancer cells to spread

published about 19 hours ago
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) Breast cancer cells can lay the groundwork for their own spread throughout the body by coaxing cells within lymphatic vessels to send out tumor-welcoming signals, according to a new report by Johns Hopkins scientists.