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Cellular recycling complexes may hold key to chemotherapy resistance

published about 17 hours ago
(Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research) Upsetting the balance between protein synthesis, misfolding, and degradation drives cancer and neurodegeneration. Recent cancer treatments take advantage of this knowledge with a class of drugs that block protein degradation, known as proteasome inhibitors. Widespread resistance to these drugs limits their success, but Whitehead researchers have discovered a potential Achilles heel in resistance. With such understandings researchers may be able to target malignancy broadly, and more effectively.

EORTC trial opens for patients with recurrent grade II or III meningioma

published about 17 hours ago
(European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer) Meningiomas are a type of brain tumor that form on membranes covering the brain and spinal cord just inside the skull. They occur at an annual incidence of up to 13 per 100,000, and approximately 20 percent of these exhibit aggressive behavior and burden patients with tumor recurrences as well as infiltration of the surrounding bone, brain, or soft tissue.

Men in China face increasing tobacco-related cancer risks

published about 17 hours ago
(Wiley) In China, smoking now causes nearly a quarter of all cancers in adult males.

New genetic mutation identified in melanoma cancer cells

published about 17 hours ago
(Boston University Medical Center) There is strong evidence that the protein complex APC/C may function as a tumor suppressor in multiple cancers including lymphoma, colorectal and breast cancer, and now melanoma. A new study has revealed that a genetic mutation leading to repression of a specific protein, Cdh1, which interacts with APC/C, is present in melanoma cancer cells.

Prophylactic surgery nearly doubles in men with breast cancer

published about 17 hours ago
(American Cancer Society) The number of men with breast cancer who undergo surgery to remove the unaffected breast has risen sharply. The report is the first to identify the trend, which mirrors a trend seen in US women over the past two decades.