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Synthetic lethality offers a new approach to kill tumor cells, explains Moffitt researcher

published about 19 hours ago
(H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute) The scientific community has made significant strides in recent years in identifying important genetic contributors to malignancy and developing therapeutic agents that target altered genes and proteins. A recent approach to treat cancer called synthetic lethality takes advantage of genetic alterations in cancer cells that make them more susceptible to certain drugs. Alan F. List, MD, president and CEO of Moffitt Cancer Center, co-authored an article on synthetic lethality featured in the ... more

Scientists trigger self-destruct switch in lung cancer cells

published about 19 hours ago
(Cancer Research UK) Cancer Research UK scientists have found a drug combination that can trigger the self-destruct process in lung cancer cells -- paving the way for new treatments.

Cell division, minus the cells

published about 19 hours ago
(Harvard Medical School) Researchers have reconstituted cell division -- complete with signals that direct molecular traffic -- without the cell. Combining frog-egg extracts with lipid membranes that mimic the membrane of the cell, they built a cell-free system that recapitulates how the cleavage furrow is assembled.

Broad Institute, Univ. of California team awarded NCI Cancer Genomics Cloud Pilot contract

published about 19 hours ago
(Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard) A team from the Broad Institute, the University of California, Berkeley, and the University of California, Santa Cruz, was awarded one of three National Cancer Institute Cancer Genomics Cloud Pilot contracts with the goal of building a system that will enable large-scale analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas and other datasets by co-locating the data and the required computing resources in one cloud environment.

Decoding the emergence of metastatic cancer stem cells

published about 19 hours ago
(Rice University) In the first study of its kind, Rice University researchers have mapped how information flows through the genetic circuits that cause cancer cells to become metastatic. The research reveals a common pattern in the decision-making that allows cancer cells to both migrate and form new tumors.